Happy Holidays, from our eLearning Ecosystem to Yours!

Congratulations! You survived and got your final courses reviewed and published for 2018! Now’s the time for a well-earned break—at least that’s what we’ll be doing. Take some time to relax, and reflect on all the good you’ve done this year, and how you can improve in 2019. We can all be better.

Whatever your plans for the holidays, we hope you have a wonderful and relaxing time spent with family and friends, or just sitting by the fire reading a good novel. If you’re looking for some good choices, Jessica or Gary can probably toss some recommendations your way.

We’ll be back in January with our regularly scheduling programing—along with some fun new formats too!

Confessions of an eLearning Student Worker

We’ve often shared how our experiences before coming to instructional design influence our work. As an eLearning team in higher education, we have the opportunity to work with traditional college students.

Our student workers come from a variety of backgrounds, and while most will not go on to work in instructional design, the experiences they gain with us strengthen their workplace skills and resume. Our students find value working with our team, and they’re excited to add their voice to Model eLearning.

Celeste Fendt
Photo credit: Asacia Norris of Junie B. Photography

Today, we’ll hear from junior Celeste Fendt. Celeste is a professional writing major and Associate Editor for Spring Arbor University’s student newspaper, The Pulse, and she plans to work in advertising after she graduates.
Continue reading “Confessions of an eLearning Student Worker”

Rest from your Labors

Monday was Labor Day here in the States.

We were at a BBQ.

Classes start this week.

We ate too much BBQ and can’t find our keyboards.

Some of us were making spaghetti sauce.

OMG, CLASSES START THIS WEEK!

These are just a few of the many reasons why we’re taking this week off from giving you new content. We’ll return to our regular schedule next week.

HOLIDAY TIME!

It’s the 4th of July weekend here in America, so we’re on the beach. Or setting off fireworks. Or just “up north” (it’s a Michigan thing). We’ll be back to our regularly scheduled content next week.

We were gonna pretend that we had some relevant way to tie this into eLearning, but it turns out sometimes, you just need to chill.

beach-coast-65900

Motivating Learners: Speaking Relevance to Your eLearning Course

As a former broadcaster, Michelle loves to share insights using audio and video tools. We’re excited to announce her posts will now be available in dual formats—on YouTube as well as the blog.

As I read the recent Motivation in Education series authored by my eLearning colleague Ann Broda, I was reminded of Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, a common technique used in persuasive speaking. Continue reading “Motivating Learners: Speaking Relevance to Your eLearning Course”

From On Air to Online

When you were a kid, what were some of your favorite games and activities? Oftentimes, insight into a child’s future career can be gained by watching how they play.

One of my favorite “toys” as a kid was my family’s handy-dandy cassette recorder. Although now archaic, it was cutting edge in the 70s. My love for recording began at age three, as I unashamedly performed such songs as “Happy Birthday” and “Old Susanna.” As I got older, I started putting together my own radio shows, which I thought were genius works of comedy.

So, how did this childhood interest translate into a career? I became a professional broadcaster. Continue reading “From On Air to Online”

Form an Online Connection: Part 2

This post is the second in a series titled, Form an Online Connection. Part 1 was published March 9, 2017. 

In my last post, Form an Online Connection, Part 1, you read about using your voice to connect with students. This time, the focus is on using your eyes. In a face-to-face course, students have the benefit of being in the same room with the instructor. This makes it possible to observe body language, vocal tone, and facial expressions. Valuable connections are made as the professor looks into each student’s eyes and allows them to return the gaze. Continue reading “Form an Online Connection: Part 2”

Form an Online Connection: Part 1

Ask any online student what they like about eLearning and they are likely to respond “the flexibility and convenience to study as it fits my schedule.” Ask them what they dislike and you may hear “the lack of personal connection.”

While students enjoy online learning, they sometimes feel isolated and detached from their instructor and peers. This is why instructors must look for ways to connect with online students. One way to connect is vocally. Continue reading “Form an Online Connection: Part 1”

Blended Learning, Part 2

8 Tips for Implementing Blended Learning in Higher Ed

Blended courses are gaining traction in higher education. In 2015, 42.3 percent of academic officers said the blended format held more promise than online courses (Allen, Seaman, Poulin, & Straut, 2016, p. 31). If you’re considering implementing blended learning in your program or higher ed institution, here are lessons I’ve learned from Spring Arbor University’s launch of a blended nursing program. Continue reading “Blended Learning, Part 2”

Blended Learning, Part 1

Effective blended learning doesn’t happen by accident; it happens by design. When done well, it can be a powerful learning environment. When done poorly, it can be a frustrating mess for students, instructors, and administrators.

As the instructional designer for SAU’s new blended RN-MSN program, I’ve learned some valuable lessons on implementing this format. In a series of posts, I’ll discuss some practical tips you can use when designing blended courses.

In this first post, I’ll give a quick overview of blending learning. Continue reading “Blended Learning, Part 1”