eLearning Feedback: Enhancing Instructor to Learner Feedback

In my last post on relevant and relational feedback, I mentioned how adding a human factor into your online courses creates another dimension of building relationships with students. Constructive, relevant, and relational feedback helps students develop an awareness of their learning as well as the ability to recognize and address their weak points on their own. Today we’ll look at audio and video feedback tools you can use to build relationships with your students and help them take these important steps in their learning.

Continue reading “eLearning Feedback: Enhancing Instructor to Learner Feedback”

Facilitating an online course: Five ways for getting it right

The first online course I developed and facilitated was Fundamentals of Speech. I was determined to get it right, because I had graduated from an online program and understood first-hand the pitfalls and frustrations students go through with a weak facilitator. In the very first week of the course I realized that it takes a lot of work to facilitate well! The second thing I realized was that it was so worth it—and so rewarding.

Since then, I’ve developed and facilitated many online courses, and enjoy being the eLearning certification trainer for new online and blended faculty at Spring Arbor University.

Continue reading “Facilitating an online course: Five ways for getting it right”

Dear Instructor—Take This Test

The next time you sit down to write a test, to place a quiz in your online course, or send off a test key to your instructional designer, ask YOURSELF some questions:

  • Will the quiz motivate your students?
  • Can you explain why each question is on the test?
  • Are you using your test to promote learning?

Punitive to Positive

Which of those words has a better ring to it? Consider making the quiz a vehicle for delivering a sense of purpose and motivating your students.

Continue reading “Dear Instructor—Take This Test”

Remove Barriers to Learning with Design and Plain Writing

Over the summer, we updated our online general education syllabus template using learning theory, universal design for learning (UDL), plain writing, and accessibility principles. Recently, Dave, Tara, and I presented this process at Continue reading “Remove Barriers to Learning with Design and Plain Writing”

Symposium on Universal Design for Instruction and Learning

While we planned to have content for you this week, we’ve spent most of our time preparing to present at IUPUC’s Symposium on Universal Design for Instruction and Learning. In our session, we’ll discuss “Why, What, & How: Using UDL in Course Materials to Enhance Learner Experience.” Don’t worry, we’ll share our research on the blog!

Since next week is Thanksgiving, we’ll be back with new content in two weeks.

Are you going to be at the Symposium? Stop by to see us!

An Overview of Universal Design for Learning

A Heightened Awareness of Accommodations

At a recent Toastmasters officers meeting in a popular coffee house, the club secretary asked me to switch seats with him. While I didn’t have a problem switching, I was curious why he wanted me to move. He informed me that as our meeting’s notetaker—and left-handed person—he needed a space conducive for taking notes. My seat was the only space at the table that met his need.

As an Instructional Designer, his request made me think about Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and the importance of designing environments to meet the needs of everyone. Continue reading “An Overview of Universal Design for Learning”

Communities of Inquiry (CoI): Cognitive Presence

Throughout this series, we’ve unpacked the three presences of Charles Sander Peirce’s Community of Inquiry (CoI) model. In my previous posts, we’ve looked at social and teaching presence. Cognitive presence, the final presence, combines both social and teaching presence. Today we’ll discuss how you can incorporate cognitive presence in your online course. Continue reading “Communities of Inquiry (CoI): Cognitive Presence”

Communities of Inquiry (CoI): Teaching Presence

In my last post, I introduced Charles Sander Pierce’s Community of Inquiry (CoI) model and discussed the importance of an instructor’s social presence in an online course. Continue reading “Communities of Inquiry (CoI): Teaching Presence”

Implementing the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Model into Your Online Course: Social Presence

As an online instructor, it can be challenging to create and maintain community with students in your courses. Last fall I discovered an education model that continues to help me create and maintain community, both as an instructional designer and as an adjunct instructor: Charles Sanders Peirce’s Community of Inquiry (CoI).

Continue reading “Implementing the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Model into Your Online Course: Social Presence”

Motivating Learners: Speaking Relevance to Your eLearning Course

As a former broadcaster, Michelle loves to share insights using audio and video tools. We’re excited to announce her posts will now be available in dual formats—on YouTube as well as the blog.

As I read the recent Motivation in Education series authored by my eLearning colleague Ann Broda, I was reminded of Monroe’s Motivated Sequence, a common technique used in persuasive speaking. Continue reading “Motivating Learners: Speaking Relevance to Your eLearning Course”